International Handbook of Teacher Education Worldwide VOL 3

International Handbook of Teacher Education Worldwide VOL 3

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ISBN : 978-9963-2415-7-6
Author : Various
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In Educating the “Right” Way (Apple 2006) and Can Education Change Society?(Apple 2013), I spend a good deal of time on the ways in which education has been and is now a significant site of struggle for both retrogressive and progressive movements. Unfortunately, it is these more retrogressive movements who are often in the driver’s seat in educational reform many nations currently.

Book Author

Various

Publisher

HM Studies

Language

English

Pages

683

Year Published

2019

We should not be surprised that education has once again become a focal point of concerted criticism. This is not new. Whenever there is significant turmoil in society, economic worries, a loss of cultural stability and a feeling that “all that is solid melts in the air,” and more—all of this has very often led to a focus on educational theories, policies, and practices as both a major cause of our social and well as educational problems and a major source of possible solutions.
This is particularly the case now. Neoliberals have pushed for privatization, the use of corporate models and logics, and competition in everything educational. Neoconservatives have urged a restoration of “real knowledge” and “tradition.” Authoritarian populist religious conservatives have lamented the “loss of God” in our schools and daily life. And they have exerted pressures at all levels of education to bring back conservative religious understandings to the central place that they supposedly once had. And new managerial impulses that stress reductive forms of measurement, accountability, and audit as the only way to judge success in schools have had powerful effects as well (Apple, 2006; See also Apple, Gandin, Liu, Meshulam, and Schirmer, 2018).
All of these movements have had very real effects not only on education in general. They have been and are equally powerful in one of the most significant areas of education, that of teacher education. One of the things that provides support for these tendencies is the lamentable fact that we live in a time of increasing disrespect of teaching and teachers in many regions. All too often there seems to an underlying assumption that the act of teaching is somehow “easy,” that it doesn’t require an extensive amount of varied skills both intellectual and interpersonal, and that therefore it can be done by almost anyone. Nothing could be farther from the truth. If anything, a robust and critically reflective teacher education, both pre-service and in-service, is required now more than ever.
The effects of these attacks on public schools and on teachers and teacher education are increasingly visible. For example, the rapid growth of home schooling speaks to the growing mistrust of teachers (Apple 2006). Conservative think tanks have become factories for the production of reports that are scathing in their condemnations of teachers and teacher education institutions, often in the absence of robust empirical evidence to support their claims. The effects are also apparent when one speaks to teachers who work so very hard in our often under-resourced schools and communities and to the teacher educators who strive to build and defend programs that are responsive to the realities that these teachers face. For many of these committed educators, the situation they face can be best seen as “management by stress.”
It has become ever more clear that education cannot be understood without recognizing that nearly all educational policies and practices are strongly influenced by an increasingly integrated international economy that is subject to severe crises, that reforms and crises in one country have significant effects in others, that immigration and population flows from one nation or area to another have tremendous impacts on what counts as official knowledge, what counts as a responsive and effective education, what counts as appropriate teaching and responsive teacher education, and the list could continue for quite a while. Indeed, all of these social and ideological dynamics and many more are now fundamentally restructuring what education does, how it is controlled, and who benefits from it throughout the world. The impact of all of this has been profound on teacher education and makes a focus on improving teacher education even more crucial today. All of these conditions make this Handbook an important contribution.
One of the wisest analysts of teacher education, Kenneth Zeichner, has consistently reminded us that while there are a multitude of proposals for “reforming teacher education” throughout the world, all too often these programs remain at the level of slogans. As he puts it, The “appearance of significant and substantive change often turns out, however, to be the illusion of change because the changes take place only on the surface while the underlying program substance and relations of power, knowledge, and coherence remain the same” (Zeichner, 2018, p. 10). For Zeichner, the key element of making lasting changes must be based on the following principle. Reforming teacher education programs and institutions must be done with an eye toward their role in expanding the space of even more critically democratic reforms (Zeichner 2009).
But, before we can understand whether reforms in teacher education or proposals to strengthen and defend it are on the surface or are genuinely aimed at expanding “the space of even more critically democratic reforms,” we need to know what is happening in the nations throughout the world that are dealing with the at times difficult, but crucial problems of educating current and future teachers to effectively face an uncertain economic, religious, ideological, and demographic world (see Apple, 2011).
This is one the reasons the International Handbook of Teacher Education Worldwide is so useful. It aims to provide us with a much needed picture of what is happening in teacher education in a considerable number of nations throughout the world. Of course, no handbook can provide us with more than a series of initial snapshots of what are very complex situations. But by bringing together these initial pictures, we can then begin to go further in dealing with the questions of how the multiple programs of teacher education described here function in our changing world.


Table of Contents

PAGES

Foreword

MICHAEL APPLE

15

Introduction of the Editors

KONSTANTINOS G. KARRAS

C. C.WOLHUTER


19

VOL 1

Afghanistan

Teacher Education in Afghanistan. Political Development and Quantitative Changes

ABBAS MADANDAR ARANI MOHAMMAD JAFARI MALEK


53

Andorra

Teacher Education in Andorra

HELENA PRIETO SANZ VIRGINIA LARRAZ RADA ROCÍO GARCÍA CARRIÓN


71

Angola

Teacher Education in Angola: conceptions, practices and challenges

SARA POÇAS FREDERICO CAVAZZINI

MARIA ANTÓNIA BARRETO


91

Argentina

Teacher Education in the Context of Argentinean Educational Policies:

Current and future Challenges

MONICA PINI SANDRA MUSANTI MYRIAM FELDFEBER MAURO BRAVO


113

Armenia

Teacher Education in a Post-Soviet Context:

the case of Armenia

SUSANNA KARAKHANYAN


129

Benin

Teacher education in the republic of Bénin.

New contexts, new perspectives

CLÉMENT C. BAH


151

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Teacher Education in Bosnia and Herzegovina

SNJEŽANA ŠUŠNJARA LEJLA KAFEDŽIĆ SANDRA BJELAN-GUSKA


155

Botswana

Teacher Education in Botswana.

MAVIS B. MHLAULI KEINYATSE KGOSIDIALWA JABULANI A. MUCHADO


175

4



Brazil

Teacher Education in the Context of Brazil Educational Policies

DALILA ANDRADE OLIVEIRA

197

Bulgaria

The preparation of teachers in Bulgaria - realities and perspectives

LIDIYA TSVETANOVA-CHURUKOVA

213

Burundi

Teacher Education in Burundi: Achievements and Challenges

HERMENEGILDE RWANTABAGU

233

Cameroon

Teacher Education: The Case of Cameroon

THERESE M.S TCHOMBE PETER CHU CHI


247

Canada

Teacher Education in Canada

LARRY PROCHNER

261

Cape Verde

Teacher Education in Cape Verde: conceptions, practices and challenges

MARIA ANTÓNIA BARRETO FILIPE SANTOS

FILOMENA OLIVEIRA


281

Chile

Teacher education in Chile: Towards a high-quality teacher education, to consolidate the achievements of Chilean education system

MARIO BRUN


301

China

Teacher Education in China

BAOCUN LIU RUIFANG ZHANG


327

Colombia

Colombia’s Education: At the Core of a Revolution

JOSÉ VICENTE ABAD OLAYA

DIANA MARCELA JARAMILLO CATAÑO CLAUDIA MARÍA URIBE HOYOS


347

Croatia

Education of teachers in the republic of Croatia: Challenges and expectations in the european surroundings

DUNJA ANĐIĆ ELVI PIRŠL ANTONIA ĆURIĆ


369

Cyprus

Teachers’ Training in Cyprus: Past, Present and Future Issues

GEORGIA PASHIARDIS PETROS PASHIARDIS


385

Czech Republic

Teacher Education in the Czech Republic

KATERINA MACHOVCOVA DAVID HANA


399

5



Democratic Republic of Congo

Teacher training in the democratic republic of Congo: Challenges and

prospects

RACHEL NSIMIRE BIGAWA


417

Denmark

Danish teacher education as a case of unresolved conflicts

HANS DORF

433

Ecuador

Teacher education in Ecuador

CLAUDIA TOBAR DANIELA BRAMWELL

451

Egypt

Teacher Education in Egypt

NAHED SHALABY

469

El Salvador

Teacher education in El Salvador: Historical, political, and technical

dimensions

D. BRENT EDWARDS JR. PAULINE MARTIN IRENE FLORES


485

Eritrea

Teacher education in Eritrea: Development and trends

SUDHASHREE PARVATI

HALIMA MOHAMMED MAHMUD

T.A. MUNAVARDEEN


503

Estonia

Teacher Education in Estonia

RAIN MIKSER

OLGA SCHIHALEJEV KARMEN TRASBERG


519

Ethiopia

Teacher Education in Ethiopia

JANA ZEHLE

537

Fiji

Teacher education

CHARMAINE KWAN

557

Finland

Equity, Trust and Autonomy - Perspectives on Teacher Education in

Finland

JESSICA ASPFORS GUNILLA HANSÉN TOM WILKMAN SVEN-ERIK HANSÉN


573

France

Teacher Education in France: From Norman Schools to ESPE

DOMINIQUE GROUX

591

6



Gambia

Teacher Education in The Gambia: Successes, Challenges and Future

Prospects HADDY NJIE SAIBA K. SUSO CHERNO BARRY


597

Germany

Teacher Education in Germany

JANA ZEHLE

611

Ghana

Teacher Education in Ghana

DANIEL ESHUN

629

Grenada

Conceptualising Teacher Education in Grenada: Social, Historical and

Policy Perspectives VERNA KNIGHT SANDRA ROBINSON JAMES YOUNG


645

Greece

GREECE - Teacher Education in Greece: training, issues and challenges

for Teacher Profession

KONSTANTINOS G. KARRAS


659

Guatemala

Current State of Teacher Preparation Programs in Guatemala

RUBY BATZ

MARTA CABALLEROS


671

Hong Kong

Education and Teacher Education in the Hong Kong Special

Administrative Region, PRC

KWOK CHAN LAI

SYLVIA YEE FAN TANG


691

Hungary

Teacher Education in the Context of Hungary Educational Policies

KATINKA BACSKAI VERONIKA BOCSI GABRIELLA PUSZTAI


711

Iceland

Teacher Education in Iceland

HANNA RAGNARSDÓTTIR

727

Indonesia

Teacher Education in Indonesia

MARK HEYWARD

741

7



VOL 2

Foreword

MICHAEL APPLE

15

Introduction of the Editors

KONSTANTINOS G. KARRAS

C. C.WOLHUTER


19

Iran

New Horizons in Teacher Education in Iran

ABBAS MADANDAR ARANI LIDA KAKIA

53

Iraq

Teacher Education in Iraq: One Step Forward, One Step Back

ABBAS MADANDAR ARANI TANDIS TAGHAVI

LIDA KAKIA


71

Ireland

Teacher Education in Ireland: Development and Challenges

J. O’FLAHERTY

J. MCMAHON

P.F. CONWAY


89

Israel

From idealism to pragmatism: Transitions in the training of teachers

in Israel public education

ADAM E. NIR MICHAEL GILLIS


111

Jamaica

Jamaica’s Teacher Education System: The Reach of History, and the

Reach for History

NIGEL O. M. BRISSETT


127

Japan

Development and Challenges of Teacher Education in Japan: Struggles

to Maintain the Quality Education

TAKAYOSHI MAKI ASAMI SHIMODA


145

Kazakhstan

Teacher Education in Kazakhstan Duishon Shamatov

AIZHAN KERIMKULOVA DAVID MCHUTCHON MIR AFZAL TAJIK


161

Kenya

Education and Teacher Education in Kenya

ROBERT W. ODUORI

173

Korea (North)

Teacher Education in North Korea

CHO, JEONG-AH LEE, HYANGKUE KIM, KI-SEOK


191

8



Korea (South)

Teacher Education in South Korea

KYOUNG-OH SONG

205

Kosovo

Teacher education in Kosovo

BLERIM SAQIPI DEME HOTI


219

Kyrgyzstan

Teacher Education in Kyrgyzstan

DUISHON SHAMATOV ABAKIR MAMYTOV ELVIRA SUPATAEVA


233

Lebanon

In-service Education in Lebanon: Current Status, Challenges, and

Future Prospects SAOUMA BOUJAOUDE ABIR JAMMOUL DANIA HAMANDI


247

Lesotho

Teacher education in Lesotho: Opportunities and Challenges

M. E. SEOTSANYANA

R. MATHEOLANE

265

Liberia

Teacher Education in Liberia

KWABENA DEI OFORI-ATTAH


281

Lithuania

Teacher Education in Lithuania

RIMANTAS ŽELVYS

297

Macao

Τeacher Education in Macao

YI-LEE WONG

319

Malawi

Teacher Education in Malawi

NDALAPA ADRIAN C MHANGO

335

Malaysia

Teacher Education in Malaysia

MENG YEW TEE LORRAINE PE SYMACO

363

Maldives

Teacher Education in the Maldives: confronting the challenges of

‘Islandness’ RHONDA DI BIASE AHMED ALI MANIKU


375

Malta

Teacher Education in Malta

RONALD G. SULTANA ADRIAN GELLEL SANDRO CARUANA


397

9



Mauritania

Teacher education in Mauritania

AKEMI YONEMURA

415

Mauritius

Teacher Education in Mauritius

HYLEEN MARIAYE

435

Mongolia

Teacher Education in Mongolia: History and Reforms

BATDULAM SUKHBAATAR BATKHAND SUKHBAATAR


455

Montenegro

Teacher education in Μontenegro

VUČINA ZORIC DIJANA VUČKOVIĆ

473

Montserrat

Teacher Education in Montserrat

GERTRUDE SHOTTE

491

Mozambique

Teacher training in Mozambique

ANA CARITA MOISÉS CAU ÓSCAR MOFATE

ROSA SERRADAS DUARTE


511

Nepal

Education System and Teacher's Education Development in Nepal

DAMODAR KHANAL

533

North Macedonia

Teacher education in North Macedonia

NATASA ANGJELESKA KIRIL BARBAREE


553

Netherlands

Teacher education in the Netherlands

BRAM DE MUYNCK PETER RUIT ANNELIES KRAAIVELD


569

New Zealand

Teacher Education in New Zealand

CAROL MUTCH JENNIFER TATEBE


589

Nicaragua

Teacher training in Nicaragua: a quality debt with education.

MELBA CASTILLO A JOSEFINA VIJIL

617

Norway

Norwegian Teacher Education between Unity and Diversity

JETTE STEENSEN

645

Oman

Teacher Education in the Sultanate of Oman; Achievements and Challenges

THURAYA ALHOSNI

661

10



Pakistan

Teacher Education in Pakistan

KHAMIS ANIL

675

Papua New Guinea

Teacher education in Papua New Guinea

MARGARET ZEEGERS

693

Paraguay

Teacher education in Paraguay

RODOLFO ELÍAS GABRIELA WALDER

ANA PORTILLO


707

VOL 3

Foreword

MICHAEL APPLE

15

Introduction of the Editors

KONSTANTINOS G. KARRAS

C. C.WOLHUTER


19

Philippines

Philippine teacher education

LORRAINE PE SYMACO ROGER CHAO JR

53

Portugal

Teacher Education in Portugal

JOÃO RUIVO HELENA MESQUITA PAULO AFONSO


75

Qatar

Teacher Education in Qatar

MAHA ELLILI CHERIF HADEEL A H M ALKHATIB

99

Romania:

Teacher Education in Romania: history, policies and challenges

HORGA, I. – APOSTU, O. MIULESCU, M.


117

Rwanda

The development of teacher education in Rwanda

NZABALIRWA, W

135

São Tomé and Príncipe

Teacher Education in São Tomé and Príncipe: conceptions, practices and

challenges

MARIA ANTÓNIA BARRETO FILIPE SANTOS

MARIA JOÃO CARDONA


149

Saudi Arabia

Teacher Education in Saudi Arabia

FAROOQ ALTAMEEMY FAHAD ALSAHLI

167

11



Serbia

Teacher Education in the republic of Serbia

BILJANA LUNGULOV OLIVERA KNEŽEVIĆ FLORIĆ STEFAN NINKOVIĆ


187

Seychelles

Seychelles Teacher Education

SHERLEY MARIE INDRA PERSAUD

205

Sierra Leone

Teacher Education in Sierra Leone

KWABENA DEI OFORI-ATTAH

223

Slovakia

Teacher training in the Slovak republic

KOSOVÁ BEATA PORUBSKÝ ŠTEFAN

241

Slovenia

Teacher Education in Slovenia

KATJA JEZNIK

KLARA SKUBIC ERMENC

257

Solomon Islands

Teacher Education in the Solomon Islands

MELLITA JONES RENATA CINELLI

273

South Africa

Teacher Education in South Africa

C C WOLHUTER

295

South Sudan

Teacher Training in South Sudan

P.J. DU TOIT

305

Spain

Teacher Education in Spain

MANUEL ROBLIZO ELENA CARRIÓN

325

Sri Lanka

Teacher Education in Sri Lanka

T. M. SAKUNTHALA YATIGAMMANA EKANAYAKE PRASAD SETHUNGA SUBHASHINIE WIJESUNDERA


339

St. Lucia

Teacher Education in St. Lucia

TALIA ESNARD SANDRA EVANS KYNEATA JOSEPH CHRISTINE DESCARTES


355

St. Vincent and the Grenadines

Teacher Education in St. Vincent and the Grenadines

DEBORAH D. P. DALRYMPLE

375

Swaziland -Kingdom of Eswatini

Teacher education in the kingdom of Eswatini

SITHULISIWE BHEBHE

393

12


Sweden

Teacher Education in Sweden

ULLA KARIN NORDÄNGER PER LINDQVIST

407

Switzerland

Teacher Education in Switzerland

ALOIS BUHOLZER MARKUS FURRER

SYBILLE HEINZMANN AGTEN


421

Syria

A preview of Teacher Education in Syria: development and challenges

AYESHA BASHIRUDDIN GHASSAN SHUGHRI

439

Taiwan

How Primary School Teachers in Taiwan Acquire a Professional Status: A

Historical Analysis

TIEN-HUI CHIANG


463

Tanzania

Teacher Education in Tanzania: Advancing Access, Equity, and Quality

MATTHEW A.M. THOMAS KRISTEEN CHACHAGE WILLY L.M. KOMBA, PH.D.


477

Thailand

Teacher Education in Thailand

NATTIYA BUNWIRAT OLIVER S. CROCCO

495

Togo

Teacher Education in Togo

SENA YAWO AKAKPO-NUMADO

511

Trinidad and Tobago

Teacher Education in Trinidad and Tobago

TALIA ESNARD

525

United Kingdom-England and Wales

Teacher Education in England

GILLIAN HILTON

543

United Kingdom-Scotland

Teacher Education in Scotland: its schools and teachers.

DONALD GRAY YVONNE BAIN DOUGLAS WEIR


565

United States of America

American Teacher Education: An Unfinished Task

GREGORUTTI, G BURTON, L.D

589

Uruguay

Teacher Education in Uruguay

ELOISA BORDOLI

SOLEDAD PASCUAL

606

13



West Bank and Palestine

Teacher Education in West bank, part of Palestine

NASSER, I SHAKHSHEER K.

621

Yemen

Yemen and Education: Teacher Education Systems and Challenges

ABDULGHANI MUTHANNA GUOYUAN SANG

635

Zambia

Teacher education in Zambia

SIMUYABA EUNIFRIDAH MANCHISHI C. PETER

651

Zimbabwe

Teacher Education in Zimbabwe: Issues and Challenges for Teacher

Professionalism MARTIN MUSENGI NATHAN MOYO


663